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Guidelines for writing Poems, Stories and Tales

What is the difference between the speaker’s view of the wall and his neighbor’s view of it?



The speaker views the wall as a way to “mend” the friendship between he and his neighbor, but the neighbor sees it as something that should be used to keep them apart.

What is the difference between the speaker’s view of the wall and his neighbor’s view of it in Mending Wall?

What do lines 27-32 reveal about the difference between the speaker’s view of the wall and his neighbor’s view of it? The neighbor believes the wall is necessary, and the speaker questions it. The neighbor wants the wall to be higher, and the speaker wants it to be lower.

What does the speaker believe about walls and neighbors?

He does not believe in walls for the sake of walls. The neighbor resorts to an old adage: “Good fences make good neighbors.” The speaker remains unconvinced and mischievously presses the neighbor to look beyond the old-fashioned folly of such reasoning. His neighbor will not be swayed.

How does the Speaker of the Mending Wall feel about the neighbor in the poem?





He hopes to implant a notion in his stubborn neighbor’s head that would allow him to question the need for a wall. Like a teenager, our speaker challenges the necessity of something that’s a big part of his life. He also acts a wee bit condescending towards his neighbor, calling him a “savage.”

How does the Speaker of the wall feel about the wall?

In the poem, the speaker is unhappy about the gaps; the reason for this is that, once the gaps are discovered, he and his neighbor must work together again to put up the wall that separates their properties.

Which different kinds of walls does the poem Mending Wall signify what reason does the Neighbour give about keeping the wall between them?

Answer: Wall in the poem “Mending the Wall” symbolizes the restrictions between neighbours. Even if you love your neighbour dearly, it is necessary to keep some limits. Otherwise your love will turn into hate.

How does the speaker’s repetition of the neighbors cherished belief about the importance of walls?

How does the speaker’s repetition of the neighbor’s cherished belief about the importance of walls (lines 27 and 45) convey the poem’s criticism of an undesirable social pattern? The speaker treats the neighbor’s words about fences as evidence of a world view that is closed-minded in general.



What is the main difference between Sandburg’s fog and Frost’s Mending Wall?



What is the main difference between Sandburg’s “Fog” and Frost’s “Mending Wall”? “Fog” uses everyday language, while “Mending Wall” does not. “Fog” uses metaphor, while “Mending Wall” does not.

How does the speaker in the poem feel about his neighbors belief that good fences make good neighbors?

He does not believe in walls for the sake of walls. The neighbor resorts to an old adage: “Good fences make good neighbors.” The speaker remains unconvinced and mischievously presses the neighbor to look beyond the old-fashioned folly of such reasoning. His neighbor will not be swayed.

What is the speaker of the poem’s attitude toward the Mending Wall and what do you think is the neighbor’s attitude toward it?

The speaker in the poem seems to have a carefree attitude towards building a wall between neighbours, especially when there is no reason for that. He seems to have a radical mind as opposed to his neighbour’s ‘darkness’, i.e., inclination to old useless prejudices.

How would you compare the attitude of the narrator and his Neighbour in the poem?

His neighbor believes keeping the fence there makes them better neighbors and wants to maintain the wall. When the narrator tries to discuss the problem of the wall with his neighbor, he gets nowhere. And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him. He only says, ‘Good fences make good neighbors.

Why does the mending of the wall by the speaker and his Neighbour appear to be an outdoor game?

Question 3: Why does the mending of the wall, by the speaker and his neighbour, appear to be an ‘outdoor game’? Answer: It has become an outdoor game because the boulders keep falling down and the neighbours keep rebuilding the wall by balancing them.

Why does the speaker think that something doesn’t like a wall?

The speaker of the poem says so because he has experienced that ‘something’ is there that causes the cold ground under the wall to swell and burst. The ground bursts in a way that the boulders come spitting out from within to the outside automatically. This ‘something’ is the unseen force of nature.

Which lines from Mending Wall indicate that the neighbor?

Which lines from “Mending Wall” indicate that the neighbor is willing to participate in mending the wall? And set the wall between us once again. We keep the wall between us as we go.



Why does the neighbor say that good fences make good Neighbours in Mending Wall?

Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall” is about the barriers people put up between themselves and others. “Good fences make good neighbors” means that people will get along better if they establish boundaries.

What does the speaker most likely think about the wall?

He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.” Based on the excerpt, what does the speaker most likely think about the wall? The wall is unnecessary.

Do you think the speaker’s attitude toward the wall changes throughout the poem or does he question its necessity from the beginning?

Q. Do you think the speaker’s attitude toward the wall changes throughout the poem, or does he question its necessity from the beginning? Yes, the author initially is confused about the need of the wall, but comes to see its importance by the end of the poem.

What does the speaker most likely think about the wall?

He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.” Based on the excerpt, what does the speaker most likely think about the wall? The wall is unnecessary.

How does the narrator feel about the gaps in the wall?

Terms in this set (3)
The narrator is skeptical of this tradition, unable to understand the need for a wall when there is no livestock to be contained only apples and pine trees. He does not believe that a wall should exist simply for the sake of existing.



Why does the speaker feel that the Neighbour lives in darkness?

As the speaker struggles between being a wall-builder and a wall-breaker, the neighbor “moves in darkness” because he cannot remove himself from this old practice. He will not go behind his father’s saying, And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, “Good fences make good neighbors.”

Does the speaker in Mending Wall think fences make good Neighbours?

He does not believe in walls for the sake of walls. The neighbor resorts to an old adage: “Good fences make good neighbors.” The speaker remains unconvinced and mischievously presses the neighbor to look beyond the old-fashioned folly of such reasoning. His neighbor will not be swayed.

How would you compare the attitude of the narrator and his Neighbour in the poem?

His neighbor believes keeping the fence there makes them better neighbors and wants to maintain the wall. When the narrator tries to discuss the problem of the wall with his neighbor, he gets nowhere. And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him. He only says, ‘Good fences make good neighbors.

Does the Mending Wall present two opposite views?

“Mending Wall” is a poem that presents two opposing attitudes towards keeping barriers up between people. Each neighbor has a different opinion. One neighbor wants a visible line to separate their property lines and the other sees no reason for it.

Why do you think the poet refers to the mending of the wall as just another kind of outdoor game?

Ans.: The Poet says that the task of mending a wall is the same as that of an outdoor game in which there are only two players, one on each side. By using this simile, he brings out the idea that there is no need of a wall between the two farms.



Why does the mending of a wall by the speaker and his Neighbour appear to be an outdoor game?

Question 3: Why does the mending of the wall, by the speaker and his neighbour, appear to be an ‘outdoor game’? Answer: It has become an outdoor game because the boulders keep falling down and the neighbours keep rebuilding the wall by balancing them.

Why does the neighbor say that good fences make good Neighbours in Mending Wall?

Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall” is about the barriers people put up between themselves and others. “Good fences make good neighbors” means that people will get along better if they establish boundaries.

How does the speaker’s conflicting attitude toward the wall develop over the course of the poem?

How does the speakers conflicting attitude toward the wall develop over the course of the poem? The speaker initiates the mending of the wall with his neighbour, but then concludes that the walls existence may not be necessary.

Do you think the speaker’s attitude toward the wall changes throughout the poem or does he question its necessity from the beginning?

Q. Do you think the speaker’s attitude toward the wall changes throughout the poem, or does he question its necessity from the beginning? Yes, the author initially is confused about the need of the wall, but comes to see its importance by the end of the poem.



What does the wall between the two farms actually separate?

What does the wall between the two farms actually separate? Apple trees from pines.

What does the wall represent in the poem Mending Wall?

The wall is a representation of the barriers to friendship and communication. The wall causes an alienation and separation between the two. The society has a lot of barriers that prevent normal communication of individuals. These include gender, religion, race and political preferences.

What does the wall represent?

The wall offers symbolic protection, securing our physical, social and economic wellbeing. For others, the symbolic wall activates opposite emotions.