Theme Times – When We Were Young!

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When We Were Young! – British Children’s Television series 1960’s

When We Were Young! – American Children’s Television series 1960’s

When We Were Young! – Australian Children’s Television series 1960’s

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Theme Times Directory

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We Were Young! [1]

We Were Young! [2]

We Were Young! [3]

We Were Young! [4]

We Were Young! [5]

We Were Young! [6]

We Were Young! [7]

We Were Young! [8]

We Were Young! [9]

We Were Young! [10]

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Part 9 – When We Were Young! [9]

Let me know below what your favourite TV shows were for you when you were young.

Here’s the last 9 from the joint list of Suze and l.

Let me know your favourites – perhaps even some that we haven’t listed and l will dedicate those shows to you in Tomorrow’s post the last in this mini series of Children’s Classical Television from the 50-70’s.

75 – Auggie Doggie and Doggie Daddy– 1959 – 1962 – 3 Seasons –  45 Episodes

Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy are Hanna-Barbera cartoon characters who debuted on The Quick Draw McGraw Show and appeared in their own segment of that show. The segments centered around the misadventures of a dachshund father-and-son team. Doggie Daddy (voiced by Doug Young with a Brooklyn accent, based on a Jimmy Durante impersonation) tried to do the best he could at raising his rambunctious son Augie (voiced by Daws Butler). The characters have made appearances outside of their series, including in their own video game and in Yogi’s Ark Lark and its spin-off series.

76 – Snagglepuss– 1959 – ? – ? Seasons –  ? Episodes

Snagglepuss is a Hanna-Barbera cartoon character debuted in prototype form in 1959 and established as a studio regular by 1962. A pink anthropomorphic cougar sporting an upturned collar, shirt cuffs, and string tie, Snagglepuss enjoys the fine things in life and shows particular affinity for the theatre. His stories routinely break the fourth wall as the character addresses the audience in self-narration, soliloquy, and asides. As originally voiced by Daws Butler, Snagglepuss seeks quasi-Shakespearean turns of phrase. Some of his campy verbal mannerisms became catchphrases: “Heavens to Murgatroyd!”, “Exit, stage left!”, and a fondness for closing sentences with the emphatic “even”.

77 – Scooby-Doo– 1969 – 1976 – 3 Seasons –  ? Episodes

Brainiac Velma, jock Fred, fashionista Daphne, hippie Shaggy, and Shaggy’s highstrung, talking Great Dane, Scooby-Doo, climb into their green van, the Mystery Machine, and hit the road in search of weird phenomena to solve. And even when Scooby and the gang aren’t actively searching for them, mysteries just have a way of falling into their laps. Ruh-roh! Scooby-Doo is an American animated franchise comprising many animated television series produced from 1969 to the present, as well as its derivative media. Writers Joe Ruby and Ken Spears created the original series Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! for Hanna-Barbera Productions in 1969. This Saturday-morning cartoon series featured teenagers Fred Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Norville “Shaggy” Rogers and their talking brown Great Dane named Scooby-Doo who solve mysteries involving supposedly supernatural creatures through a series of antics and mis-steps

78 – The Ghost and Mrs Muir– 1968 – 1970 – 2 Seasons –  50 Episodes

The Ghost & Mrs. Muir is an American sitcom based on the 1947 film of the same name, which was based on the 1945 novel by R. A. Dick. It premiered in September 1968 on NBC. After NBC cancelled the series, it aired on ABC for one season before being cancelled a final time.

79 – Seasme Street– 1969 – Present – 50 Seasons –  4500+ Episodes

A longtime favorite of children and adults, and a staple of PBS, “Sesame Street” bridges many cultural and educational gaps with a fun program. Big Bird leads a cast of characters teaching children numbers, colors and the alphabet. Bert and Ernie, Oscar the Grouch and Grover are just a few of the other creatures involved in this show, set on a city street full of valuable learning opportunities.

80 – Zorro– 1957 – 1961 – 2 Seasons –  82 Episodes

The masked swordsman swashes a mean buckle as the dashing alter ego of 19th century Spanish California aristocrat Don Diego de la Vega. His faithful manservant, Bernardo, pretends to be a deaf mute so he can eavesdrop. Dimwitted Sgt. Garcia is kind-hearted and loyal. Don Alejandro is Diego’s wealthy father.

81 – F Troop– 1965 – 1967 – 2 Seasons –  65 Episodes

The accidentally heroic and chronically inept Wilton Parmenter is given command of Fort Courage, Kan., a dumping ground for the Army’s least useful men, at the end of the Civil War. There, he contends with the illegal business enterprises of crafty Sgt. O’Rourke and the local Indians, occasional mock (and even more occasionally real) battles, and the romantic attentions of Wrangler Jane Angelica Thrift.

82 – Pepe Le Pew– 1945 – Present – ? Seasons –  ? Episodes

Pepé Le Pew is a character from the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons, first introduced in 1945. Depicted as a French striped skunk, Pepé is constantly in search of love and appreciation. However, his offensive skunk odor and his aggressive pursuit of romance typically cause other characters to run from him.

83 – Pink Panther Show– 1969 – 1979 – 10 Seasons –  ? Episodes

The Pink Panther Show is a showcase of animated shorts produced by David H. DePatie and Friz Freleng between 1969 and 1978, starring the animated Pink Panther character from the opening credits of the live-action films. The series was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie–Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969, to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978, to September 1, 1979, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show).

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Well there we go Folks, that is the 9 part listing of TV shows from Suze and my own childhoods [Part 1] Part 2 later in the year will look at the 70’s-80’s. Now tomorrow is the final part to this particular Mini Series and l will hand it over to you … any shows you want to see again or our list didn’t include perhaps?

So far for tomorrow’s episode we have “Dobie Gillis, Casper and Spooky, Captain Kangaroo, Gidget, Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales and Leave it to Beaver!’ To name but a few – so maybe you have some you would like to see? If so let me know below.

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17 thoughts on “Theme Times – When We Were Young!

  1. I vaguely remember The ghost and Mrs Muir! Pink panther was and is still a favorite. Sesame Street is not my cup of tea. My kids loved it.

        1. Yes l think it had a certain appeal to specific ages perhaps. When l first started seeing it on Australian TV it was around 1973 and at that time l was already 10, but my sister was five – so that may have explained it.

  2. Am I the only person on the planet who never watched cartoons? I never liked cartoons nor do I like animated films except for “Coraline” . Disney doesn’t do it for me or any animation at all – ever – of any kind! As Bill the Cat says – Thbbft! (But I like comic strips which some folks call cartoons).

  3. Liked all of these, especially Sesame Street and Pink Panther 😊 Christmas Eve on Sesame Street is still one of my favorite Christmas shows. I remember when everyone thought Snuffy was imaginary. I had a homemade stuffed elephant that I called Snuffy. Thank you for the happy memories. It’s been fun thinking about all these shows again.

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