The Greats of our Time

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Glenn Close by Mingle Media TV

Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is an American actress, singer and producer. She is the recipient of numerous accolades, including three Tony Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, and three Primetime Emmy Awards. A seven-time Academy Award nominee, she holds the record as the actress to have the most nominations without winning. In 2016, Close was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.

Born to the surgeon William Close in Greenwich, Connecticut, Close majored in theater and anthropology at the College of William & Mary. She began her professional career on stage in 1974 with Love for Love and was mostly a New York stage actress until the early 1980s. Her work included Broadway productions of Barnum in 1980 and The Real Thing in 1983, for which she won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. Her film debut came in The World According to Garp (1982), which was followed by supporting roles in the films The Big Chill (1983) and The Natural (1984); all three earned her nominations for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Close went on to establish herself as a leading lady in Hollywood with roles in Fatal Attraction (1987) and Dangerous Liaisons (1988), both of which earned her nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Close won two more Tony Awards for Death and the Maiden in 1992 and Sunset Boulevard in 1995. She won her first Primetime Emmy Award for the 1995 television drama film Serving in Silence: The Margarethe Cammermeyer Story, and she continued a successful career in Hollywood with starring roles in Reversal of Fortune (1990), 101 Dalmatians (1996), and Air Force One (1997), among others. Further television work came for Close in the 2000s, with her portrayal of Eleanor of Aquitaine in the 2003 television film The Lion in Winter earning her a Golden Globe Award. From 2007 to 2012, Close starred as Patty Hewes in the drama series Damages, which won her a Golden Globe Award and two more Primetime Emmy Awards. She returned to the Broadway stage in a 2014 revival of A Delicate Balance. During this period, she received two additional Best Actress Academy Award nominations for Albert Nobbs (2011) and The Wife (2017), winning a third Golden Globe for the latter.

Close has been married three times, and she has a daughter from her relationship with producer John Starke. She is the president of Trillium Productions and has co-founded the website FetchDog. She has made political donations in support of Democratic politicians, and is vocal on issues such as gay marriage, women’s rights, and mental health.

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The Greats Of Our Time Directory

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I should imagine you wouldn’t be surprised to hear that the first film l saw Glenn Close in was actually the 1987 film Fatal Attraction. You either like Glenn or you don’t it’s that simple a statement, l like her and here are my top ten choices. Are you a fan or not? If so what are your favourites and if not, why don’t you like her?

1 – Fatal Attraction – 1987

For Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas), life is good. He is on the rise at his New York law firm, is happily married to his wife, Beth (Anne Archer), and has a loving daughter. But, after a casual fling with a sultry book editor named Alex (Glenn Close), everything changes. Jilted by Dan, Alex becomes unstable, her behavior escalating from aggressive pursuit to obsessive stalking. Dan realizes that his main problem is not hiding his affair, but rather saving himself and his family.

2 -Dangerous Liasions – 1988

The Marquise de Merteuil (Glenn Close) and the Vicomte de Valmont (John Malkovich) display the petty jealousies and jaded insouciance of life in France’s royal court in the 18th century, casually ruining the lives of de Merteuil’s young romantic rival (Uma Thurman), the music teacher (Keanu Reeves) for whom she secretly pines and the upstanding Madame de Tourvel (Michelle Pfeiffer). But when actual romantic feelings begin to surface, their games take on a more treacherous air.

3 -The Big Chill – 1983

A once close-knit gang of friends — including an actor (JoBeth Williams), a doctor (Glenn Close) and her husband (Kevin Kline), a Vietnam veteran (William Hurt), and a journalist (Tom Berenger) — meets for a weekend after the funeral of their much-envied friend Alex, who committed suicide. The friends spend the weekend confronting the personal truths, sacrifices and betrayals that have left them disenchanted. Each must contend with unresolved issues they have with Alex, and with one another.

4 – The Wife – 2017

Joan and Joe remain complements after nearly 40 years of marriage. Where Joe is casual, Joan is elegant. Where Joe is vain, Joan is self-effacing. And where Joe enjoys his very public role as the great American novelist, Joan pours her considerable intellect, grace, charm and diplomacy into the private role of a great man’s wife. As Joe is about to be awarded the Nobel Prize for his acclaimed and prolific body of work, Joan starts to think about the shared compromises, secrets and betrayals.

5 – Reversal of Fortune – 1990

When socialite Sunny von Bülow (Glenn Close) inexplicably slips into an irreversible coma, police suspect foul play — and the obvious suspect is her urbane husband, Claus (Jeremy Irons). After being found guilty of murder, Claus is granted a retrial and hires showboat Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz (Ron Silver) to represent him. Though unconvinced of Claus’s innocence, Dershowitz enjoys a challenge and — along with a group of his students — fights to have the verdict overturned.

6 – Sarah, Plain and Tall – 1991

In 1910 Kansas, widowed farmer Jacob Witting (Christopher Walken) is having a hard time raising his children and running his farm without the help of a wife. He puts an ad in the paper for a bride to help him, and gets a response from a woman named Sarah (Glenn Close), who only describes herself as “plain and tall.” Sarah travels to the farm for a one-month trial period, but finds Jacob’s stubborn attitude and his daughter’s view of her as a replacement mother difficult to bear.

7 – The World According to Garp – 1982

A nurse during World War II, Jenny Fields (Glenn Close) conceives with a dying pilot and bears a boy named T.S. Garp (Robin Williams) whom she raises alone. When Garp grows up, he has some success writing fiction, but not nearly so much as his mother has with feminist-themed nonfiction. Rich and famous, she starts a center for troubled women, and while Garp marries and has children, he remains a constant, if somewhat critical, observer of the strange community that forms around Jenny.

8 – 101 Dalmations – 1996

The dastardly Cruella De Vil chances upon a litter of cute dalmatian puppies and decides that their skins will make her the perfect new coat. After she sends two hapless heavies to steal the dogs, it is up to parents Pongo and Perdy to stage a daring rescue. Joining them for the adventure are their human `pets’ and host of guest animals including a cheeky raccoon and a helpful horse.

9 – Hamlet – 1990

Franco Zeffirelli’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy about the young prince of Denmark who is plagued by indecision when he vows to avenge his father’s murder. Filmed on location around the UK, including Stonehaven in Scotland, the film boasts an impressive ensemble cast.

10 – The Paper – 1994

Henry Hackett (Michael Keaton) is an editor at the New York Sun, a tabloid paper facing financial cuts. His pregnant wife, Martha (Marisa Tomei), pleads with him to get a more respectable job so he can spend more time with his family. Hackett is considering an offer from another paper, with fewer hours and higher pay, when he gets his hottest story in years. When this scoop leads to a burst of violence and a conflict with his new boss, Alicia (Glenn Close), he faces a startling moment of truth.

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So there we go folks, my top 10. What are yours?

 

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